Category Archives: Compliance

ANSI/ISEA 121-2018 Just Dropped. Here’s the Deal.

As you probably already know the American National Standards Institute publishes a voluntary set of standards and best practices for the construction industry. The latest standard addresses equipment used to tether and/or contain hand tools, components and other objects that could fall from at-heights applications. Increasing numbers of employees are finding themselves ascending to heights to complete their work often directly over or adjacent to their colleagues, by-standers and other individuals at lower levels. Protective equipment, such as hard hats, have long been available to minimize the effects of struck-by incidents only after an object has fallen. Active controls utilized to prevent falling objects by tying them off or containing them while at heights are a rapidly growing practice. Dropped objects include hand tools, instrumentation, small parts, structural components and other items that have to be transferred and used at heights.

Ritz Safety Fall Protection ANSI TetherANSI/ISEA is offering further guidance on the design and testing of products with anchor and connection points (after original manufacturer). Specifically, containers and tool tethers with carabiner or snaphook-type connectors should have locking gates and captive eyes. Containers should also have a minimum of a closure system, integral anchor points or integral tethers. Ritz Safety works with suppliers like 3M and Ergodyne to promote these voluntary, consensus standards across their fall protection products.

Is Your Workplace GHS Compliant?

OSHA’s updated Hazard Communication Standard rule changes go into effect on June 1, 2016.  Will your workplace be compliant with the new GHS labeling standards by then?

The Globally Harmonized System (GHS) is an international standard for communicating the hazards present in chemicals.  Effective June 1, all workplace labeling must be replaced by GHS pictograms, and employees must be trained to recognize the new communication standards.

There is still time to make your workplace compliant!  Contact us today for help with the transition, or you can purchase GHS compliant labels and new SDS booklets on our website.

Time is running out – make sure your workplace is in compliance today!

More information on the new Hazard Communication Standard:
OSHA Hazard Communication Standard
Background on the switch to GHS
GHS Fact Sheet

Gas Cans – Knowing What to Use

Fuel, whether it is gasoline or diesel, likely runs many aspects of your business. If not stored properly, that same fuel can be a serious safety and compliance concern. Is your fuel stored and transported in FM and DOT/UN approved containers?

If you answered “no,” or you’re not sure, take a look at the guide below, which was created by Justrite, one of our partners in safety. This guide will help you find the right container for your business, so you can stay safe and compliant!

Justrite Tech Talk – Containers

Looking for the right gas can for your application? Check out the range of cans we carry, or call us at 1-800-451-3077 to speak to a safety expert today!

Online Safety Training from NSC

Are you compliant with all driver training requirements for your employees? The National Safety Council now offers online Defensive Driving and other compliance courses, to enable employers to train workers quickly, easily, and at the employee’s pace.

NSC online training courses integrate full-motion video, animation, interactive user exercises and real-world situations to provide a comprehensive, technically-sound solution for employers needing compliant safety training.

Check out the NSC online safety training catalog for current offerings!

Fall Protection Tops OSHA Fines for 2014

According to recent report by Industrial Safety & Hygiene News (ISHN), fall protection violations topped OSHA’s reported workplace violations for 2014, resulting in nearly $20 million in fines levied against employers. (Top OSHA Violations…)

DBI7605060 app

The construction industry accounted for the vast majority of fall protection fines, gathering $17 million among specialty trade contractors alone. Other industries, from heavy and civil engineering to real estate saw large quantities of fines levied as well.

Fall protection is serious business.  Proper adherence to OSHA rules and regulations can mean the difference between life and death or serious injury for your workers. Click here for more information on OSHA’s fall protection standards. 

Not sure if your jobsite is in compliance with the relevant regulations? Ritz Safety can schedule a jobsite safety audit to help you stay safe and avoid costly violations. Contact us today to request a safety audit at your location!

Cutting Through the Confusion of Cut Resistance

Workers and employers seeking cut resistant gloves in today’s marketplace have more options than ever before. From traditional leather and knit cut resistant fabrics, to more advanced, lightweight coated options, picking the right glove for the job is a daunting task! Cut resistance levels can add another layer of confusion to the mix, as different measurement standards are used or cited by different manufacturers. With all this complexity, how do you find the glove YOU need? Our friends at DuPont® (makers of Kevlar® brand cut resistant fabric) have put together a useful guide for understanding the ins and outs of cutting-edge cut resistance. The full guide is linked at the bottom of this article.

The first thing to consider in choosing a cut resistant glove is the Cut Level. But, three different standards exist, and they are not interchangeable.

  1. ASTM F1790 (US) and ISO 13997 (International)
    These methods both use a straight-edge blade under load to cut a sample. The sample is cut five times each at three different loads, to determine the required load to cut through the sample at a reference distance of 20mm.
  2. ASTM F1790-05
    This is an updated and more accurate testing method, which improved on the results found using the old ASTM F1790 test. As a result of this more stringent testing, material tested under the new standard will typically achieve a lower cut resistance rating than in previous tests with the old method.
  3. EN 388
    The EN 388 test method uses a circular blade under a fixed load. The blade moves back and forth across the sample until it is cut through. The cut resistance is measured as a ratio of the number of cycles needed to cut through the test sample vs. a reference material.

All test methods assign a Performance Level from 0 – 5 to each glove. These levels give a good general idea of the performance of a glove, but the actual performance values should be used when comparing two products. In addition, ASTM and EN 388 cut levels are NOT interchangeable. See the charts below for details on how the cut levels break down.

ANSI/ISEA Cut Levels (using results from ASTM F1790, ASTM F1790-05 or ISO 13997 tests)

ASTM Cut Level Table

EN 388 Cut Levels

EN 388 Cut Level Table

The Gloves category on our website now allows you to filter results by ANSI or EN cut levels. If you’re looking for more information, or need some help comparing different glove options, contact one of our experienced account representatives. For more information about cut resistance testing, check out this comprehensive guide from DuPont®.

Start Your Emergency Action Plan Today!

In the conclusion to our 4-part series, Donna Wishart discusses how to get started with an Emergency Action Plan for your facility or jobsite.  This essential step will put you the right path towards a safer workplace and a more informed staff.

Emergencies can strike without warning and effect your company’s ability to maintain production.  When an emergency hits, your response could mean the difference between life and death.

Survival can depend upon your readiness. No matter what type of business you are in, an effective Emergency Action Plan will help to ensure your employees can survive the worst possible emergency.

Your emergency response plan needs to be not only current but effective. It cannot be a policy on paper only. Your plan needs to include proper equipment and adequate training as well as proper maintenance of both.

Things to Consider

  • What are your human resources?  How many employees do you have?
  • What type of facility do you have – warehouse, office, outdoor jobsite?
  • What type of work is conducted in your workplace?
  • What medical dangers might be present?
  • Do you have an Emergency Response Team?
  • How close are your local EMS locations, and how quickly can they respond?
  • What first aid supplies do you currently have, and what new supplies might you need?
  • Do you offer regular training to first responders?  Is the training geared toward the specific hazards present in your workplace?

Donna Wishart is the owner of Wishart Safety Training, Inc., a local partner with Ritz Safety in the Tampa, FL area. Wishart Safety Training currently offers a variety of first aid training classes, including CPR and AED training.

To take the next step, and begin your Emergency Action Plan, contact Wishart Safety or your local Ritz Safety representative!

Class 2, Class 3, Non-ANSI…What Kind of Hi-Vis Gear Do YOU Need?

With so many different options for high-visibility apparel, how do you know if you’ve got the right gear? Check out our handy guide to the ANSI/SEA 107-2010 for quick and simple definitions of Class 1 (or Non-ANSI), Class 2 and Class 3.

Use this guide to determine what level of hi-vis gear is required in YOUR workplace:

Ritz Safety carries a wide variety of Class 1, Class 2 and Class 3 safety apparel. We’ve got the gear to fit your compliance requirements and jobsite needs.